Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Firefighters responding to fire at Breezy Point Resort

Grim's Grub: Get a taste of 'A Taste of History'

Those fundraiser cookbooks hold the recipes of hundreds of families and family members. The food they made was important to someone beyond the physical nourishment it provided. It's often like a signature or a fingerprint. These cookbooks commemorate them, so collecting those books, to me, is a part of preserving history, family and even happiness.

In my opinion column, I've asked people to let me know if they want to sell their old copy of "Logsleds to Snowmobiles" (I'm still looking for a copy) or if they want to donate old copies of their Backus Area News newspapers (also still looking).

I am semi-obsessed with local history books, and by extension recipe books that document the history that is local culinary taste. Thanks to a monetary Christmas gift I finally went out and purchased a book that falls into both categories.

"A Taste of History: Tales and Tastes of the Crosslake Area Past" has had my attention for a while. It's one of the more available tomes of local history and as such it shouldn't have taken me this long to buy a copy, considering I only had to go to a gift shop in Crosslake to find it. And I love it.

I don't know that my family ever contributed to those common church fundraiser cookbooks. If anyone from Akeley knows of old Grimler or Poncelet recipes floating around, I'd jump at the chance to see them. The same goes for Traynors and Hegstads. It is my understanding my grandpa had a bakery at one point and while his personal cookbook vanished, maybe his recipes are out there somewhere (Clair Traynor, in case such recipes exist).

I'm excited to have a bread pudding recipe that apparently came from my Uncle Dick. I am sad to have lost a pickled fish recipe by my Uncle Dean. I am more sad to know Grandpa Traynor's cookbook with his handwritten notes and recipes disappeared in some long ago move, but it brightens my day to know my aunts have Grandma Grimler's cookbooks with much the same notes.

Those relatives are gone now, so you may understand my excitement and disappointment concerning their recipes.

Those fundraiser cookbooks hold the recipes of hundreds of families and family members. The food they made was important to someone beyond the physical nourishment it provided. It's often like a signature or a fingerprint. These cookbooks commemorate them, so collecting those books, to me, is a part of preserving history, family and even happiness.

I hope that when people pick up these books and see a family member's name, they can't help but feel a little nostalgic (and more when they eat the food!). That is why "A Taste of History" gets a real hats off from me.

Margaret Kunze's Baked Minnesota Walleye with Wild Rice

Serves 8

From "A Taste of History: Tales and Tastes of the Crosslake Area Past"

  • 4 ounces butter
  • ½ cup chopped onions
  • 8 ounces mushrooms, chopped
  • 8 fresh walleye fillets
  • 1 cup cooked wild rice
  • 6 ounces sliced almonds
  • ½ pound butter
  • Bread crumbs
  • Salt and pepper to taste

In 4 ounces of butter, saute ½ cup onions until almost clear. Add the mushrooms and cooked wild rice.

Season the fillets with salt and pepper. Roll in bread crumbs. Place the fillets in the oven and bake at 450 degrees for about 15 minutes. In ½ pound of butter, saute the sliced almonds. Serve the fillets with the wild rice on the side. Spoon the butter and almonds over the fillets and rice.

Mamie Pfaender's Brown Sugar Cookies

From "A Taste of History: Tales and Tastes of the Crosslake Area Past"

  • 1 cup Spry vegetable shortening
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • ½ cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix the ingredients in order. Drop spoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet. Press the cookies with the bottom of a glass, dipped in sugar. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes.

Advertisement